Clark (Consciencious)

Even The Roads Have A DISC Style

As I've traveled around the world sharing the Taking Flight! birds with people of all walks of life, I've noticed that culture has a strong impact on how people act.

It seems that how the DISC styles are displayed can vary depending upon where people are located. So, all D's (and I's, S's and C's for that matter) are not created equally.

I was recently leading a Taking Flight with DISC seminar in New York City. Two days later, I conducted a retreat in Albuquerque, New Mexico. With the Albuquerque session following directly on the heels of the NY program, the differences between the two cultures was starkly apparent.  I found that NYC's pace was much faster than that of Albuquerque. People were more direct and assertive in NY. Even their volume was louder.  By contrast, the people in Albuquerque were warm and inviting. They spoke slower and didn't seem to be in such a rush.  

While driving to NY, I noticed that the highway on-ramps were approximately 20 feet in length. I had to expertly accelerate to 55 m.p.h. and sneak my car between two other vehicles that were approximately 10 feet apart.

In New Mexico, I couldn't help but notice that as I left the airport and prepared to merge onto the highway, I had about a mile's worth of on-ramp to join the flow of traffic. It felt like the highway was inviting me to join the other travelers, "Take your time. Join us when you're ready."

I wondered if the DISC styles created the infrastructure of the highway system or the layout of the highways and the rest of the infrastructure impacted people's styles. Perhaps it's both.

So, back to the people. While in NYC, I found that even the S's were direct.  In fact, the New York S's seemed like Albuquerque D's. The New York I's were louder and more animated than the Albuquerque I's.  The C's and S's in Albuquerque were more soft-spoken than the C's and S's in New York.

Our personality, is therefore based on both nature (our genetics and innate hard wiring) and our environment (where we're from and how we're raised.)  Take a moment to consider where you're from and how your surroundings helped to create who you are.


Merrick Rosenberg